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Comments about the feature article: The Golden Age of British Recording

The Golden Age of British Recording
In the early 1960s, at the beginning of the British Invasion, the studio scene in England was thriving, but it was very different from that in America. The British studios used different gear and got a very different sound than their U.S. counterparts. In recent years, many of the major recording studios closed in England, and much of the history of those studios was in danger of fading away.

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So sorry to be a pedant but "foreword" not "forward".
i.e. words that come before.
I see it misspelt so often.
Apologies.
John.

Now I can go back and read the article. Looks very interesting.
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So sorry to be a pedant but "foreword" not "forward".

Oops. You are 100% correct. My bad! Thanks for pointing that out.
It's one of the drawbacks, I find, for having taught English in Germany for a number of years, I can't read anything any more without typo's and incorrect sentence construction leaping out at me. Too often it spoils the enjoyment.

Fascinating article about early UK recording studios.
I remember an interview with Peter Sellers and Harry Secombe where they joked about the BBC engineers treating the microphone as sacrosanct. "Don't touch the mic.!" Mark you they'd probably have been ribbons in those days and very fragile.

My first machine was a mono Ferrograph (with valves) and an ex BBC ribbon mic.
Gosh! When was that? Late fifties I suppose.
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My first machine was a mono Ferrograph (with valves) and an ex BBC ribbon mic.
Gosh! When was that? Late fifties I suppose.

An old BBC ribbon mic. Very cool. :bravo:
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